Martyn Goodacre photobook

“Just by chance I met up with a friend who’d come down from the Midlands. He’d morphed from a public school boy Jam fan into a revolutionary liberator of empty council flats in hard-to-let areas where boarded up flats outnumbered the ones occupied. Suddenly I had become a squatter. It was all remarkably easy. Nobody wanted to live in a rough-as-hell estate just off the Old Kent Road where I would meet an assortment of vagabonds, lollopers, scruffy ‘erberts, vicious Sids and psychedelic dandies. It would become my home for twenty-two very full, very stimulating unpredictable years,” Martyn Goodacre, in an excerpt from his introduction to the second book from Cold Lips Press – links to podcast here.

Do you recognise his iconic photograph of Kurt Cobain? Continue reading Martyn Goodacre photobook

Mark Reeder podcast with Kirsty Allison

Recorded in Berlin February, around the launch of Martyn Goodacre’s book, Kirsty first met Mark Reeder in London, at the Tresor retrospective hosted by Red Gallery.

Subsequently she featured him in her pages in DJMag, not once or twice, but in the feature that spanned his beginnings as the Berlin rep for Factory Records in the late 70s, to putting on illegal gigs in East Berlin before the wall fell, to creating MFS Records in the 90s – and now with Chinese band, Stolen – OVER THREE EDITIONS. Unknown pleasures.

Here they met in a coffee shop on a Sunday afternoon. Continue reading Mark Reeder podcast with Kirsty Allison

Burning Flag Film for Gil by Kirsty Allison

Burning Flag begs for a borderless world, and stands as a warning against nationalism.

Rather than Gil filming his own video on his iPhone, and sourcing found footage, it was natural for Kirsty to film Gil’s vision of having projections for the single Burning Flag, performed on a Saturday at Brixton’s Beyond Time Pictures studio. It’s a live performance with Mikey Buckley on guitar, who also mixed this album, with Joes Watts on bass, and Kirsty on keys. Continue reading Burning Flag Film for Gil by Kirsty Allison

Dr John Cooper Clarke podcast

“People are always saying ‘literally’ and they mean figuratively. Literally doesn’t mean literally anymore. Cause what defines a meaning of a word is how it is used. Language ain’t hard and fast, even in the Oxford dictionary. So ‘literally’ now, if you look in the Oxford English Dictionary, it no longer means the absolute fact. This is the conversation: He treated her like shit, literally. What? He flushed her down the lavatory? I mean no, surely, figuratively? In this case.” Continue reading Dr John Cooper Clarke podcast